Archive for the ‘News’ Category

How to cut Suboxone films when tapering

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

The following is an interesting video on how to cut Suboxone films when conducting a taper.  Because there are no 0.3 mg buprenorphine tablets approved for ORT in the United States, it can be very difficult to properly divide doses once patients get below the 1 mg marker.  Although this video was not created by a medical professional, anecdotally, it appears as though many have been successful using this method.

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Top 10 Medications in September 2013

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

In September 2013, the top ten medications users searched for on TPC! were as follows:

  1. M / 57 71 — 10 mg Methadone (Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals)
  2. WATSON 749 — 5 mg Oxycodone, 325 mg Acetaminophen (Watson Pharmaceuticals)
  3. IP 203 — 5 mg Oxycodone, 325 mg Acetaminophen (Amneal Pharmaceuticals)
  4. WATSON 932 — 10 mg Oxycodone, 325 mg Acetaminophen (Watson Pharmaceuticals)
  5. V / 3585 — 7.5 Hydrocodone, 200 mg Ibuprofen (Qualitest Pharmaceuticals)
  6. PERCOCET 10/325 — 10 mg Oxycodone, 325 mg Acetaminophen (Endo Pharmaceuticals)
  7. 54 142 — 10 mg Methadone (Roxane Laboratories)
  8. M 2 — 2 mg Hydromorphone (Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals)
  9. M / C 13 — 0.5 mg Clonazepam (Mylan Pharmaceuticals)
  10. V / 3604 — 5 mg Hydrocodone, 325 mg Acetaminophen (Qualitest Pharmaceuticals)

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A commitment to security and privacy

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Over the past few months, we’ve learned that our own government has violated the privacy of almost every internet-surfing American, as well as many foreigners.  In order to protect the privacy of our users, we now offer the ability to use a secure connection, just like on Facebook, Amazon, and the web site of your banking institution.  While we encourage all of our users to utilize this feature, it is completely optional and the standard http://www.thatspoppycock.com address will still work.

To access the That’s Poppycock! with a secure connection, use the following address:

https://www.thatspoppycock.com

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New mobile-friendly site launched

Saturday, September 14th, 2013

When That’s Poppycock! was launched, the user base was comprised almost entirely of desktop users.  Over the past few years, we have witnessed a dramatic shift from desktop to mobile-centric browsing.  Last month, over 60 percent of our users visited using smartphones and tablets.  In order to accommodate the smartphone revolution and better serve our user base, we have been tirelessly working on creating a mobile-friendly site.  Today, we are pleased to announce the launch of the very first mobile-friendly design at TPC.  Please feel free to use the comments section to provide feedback or report any issues.  As always, we thank you for your continued support.

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TPC! is now on Facebook

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

As of earlier today, That’s Poppycock! is officially a part of the Facebook community.  This will make it easier for us to share important news and new content whether it involves updated content or new pill imprints.  Please LIKE us if you have found our content helpful!

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New TPC! Forum

Sunday, May 22nd, 2011

Recently, hundreds of thousands of spammed messages paralyzed our message boards, where many recovering addicts come to seek help and support, and parents come for basic information.  As That’s Poppycock! has grown, we have had to resort to more sophisticated methods of handling spam and other issues, and so we have decided to switch to a new message board service.  There are several perks to the new forum system:

  • Full integration between TPC! and the forums allowing users to utilize one single username instead of two different usernames
  • Simpler, extremely easy-to-use interface
  • Most importantly, integration with a sophisticated spam processing service

We hope that users will welcome this transition and help get the message boards started again.  The forum can still be accessed at the same URL, and through the link in the navigation bar.

Thanks,

TPC! Management

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WARNING: DEA warns about int’l extortion scheme, impersonation of federal agents

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

The DEA recently released a warning explaining a recent scam that targets former or current customers of online pharmacies. The DEA’s warning is pasted in full below, and includes a phone number to report any threats.

The Drug Enforcement Administration is warning the public about criminals posing as DEA special agents or other law enforcement personnel as part of an international extortion scheme.

The criminals call the victims (who in most cases previously purchased drugs over the lnternet or by telephone) and identify themselves as DEA agents or law enforcement officials from other agencies. The impersonators inform their victims that purchasing drugs over the lnternet or by telephone is illegal, and that enforcement action will be taken against them unless they pay a fine. In most cases, the impersonators instruct their victims to pay the “fine” via wire transfer to a designated location, usually overseas. If victims refuse to send money, the impersonators often threaten to arrest them or search their property. Some victims who purchased their drugs using a credit card also reported fraudulent use of their credit cards.

Impersonating a federal agent is a violation of federal law. The public should be aware that no DEA agent will ever contact members of the public by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment.

The DEA reminds the public to use caution when purchasing controlled substance pharmaceuticals by telephone or through the Internet. It is illegal to purchase controlled substance pharmaceuticals online or by telephone unless very stringent requirements are met. And, all pharmacies that dispense controlled substance pharmaceuticals by means of the lnternet must be registered with DEA. By ordering any pharmaceutical medications online or by telephone from unknown entities, members of the public risk receiving unsafe, counterfeit, and/or ineffective drugs from criminals who operate outside the law. In addition, personal and financial information could be compromised.

Anyone receiving a telephone call from a person purporting to be a DEA special agent or other law enforcement official seeking money should refuse the demand and report the threat.

Report Extortion Scam: 1-877-792-2873

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Rx opiates tied to more deaths than heroin and cocaine combined

Monday, August 30th, 2010

Overdose deaths in the United StatesAccording to the National Vital Statistics System, prescription narcotics such as OxyContin and morphine cause more deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.  In at least 15 states, prescription drug deaths occur more frequently than auto accident deaths.  This represents new evidence that could help shift the dialog on the failed War on Drugs.

The term War on Drugs is attributed to President Nixon, and was first used on June 17, 1971.  The current Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Gil Kerlikowske, does not use this terminology; however, he has essentially kept the same philosophy we’ve used for the last 40 years, which we can confidently say has failed miserably.

In the 80s and 90s, the slogan of the failed War on Drugs was “just say no,” which was pushed by Fmr. First Lady Nancy Reagan.  This slogan only makes matters worse, as it implies a sort of moral deficiency.  Drug addiction is a proven medical problem, an illness.   Treating addiction as a moral deficiency or personality defect not only contributes to stigma, but also serves as negative reinforcement which ultimately ends up pushing addicts away from treatment centers, and into the darkest corners of the globe.

The incorrect accusation that addicts are “morally deficient” encourages an atmosphere where people expect rehabilitation to occur when addicts are sent to prison.  Such an atmosphere is not conducive to a stable recovery.  We attempt to resolve a social and individual problem by criminalizing the possession of drugs, but once they get to court, they are given sentences to be carried out in prison instead of rehabilitation centers.  Just as bad are judges who give split sentences, where part of the sentence is carried out in jail and part in rehab.  Although studies reveal that marijuana is much safer than alcohol, our system often punishes casual marijuana users, who are otherwise law-abiding.

American and world citizens need an honest education when it comes to drug addiction and dependency.  The D.A.R.E. program, another product of the failed War on Drugs, employs scare tactics and partial education.  D.A.R.E. needs to be abolished and replaced with a learning system that not only promotes abstinence, but educates individuals and families about the biology and psychology of addiction, and includes a harm reduction approach in addition to abstinence.

Scare tactics and imprisonment do not resolve the many issues associated with drug addiction, especially when drugs are often a symptom of an underlying problem.  Understanding that addicts cannot be forced to stop is another important step in this process.  Until we undergo a massive reconstruction of our drug policies, including adopting a new strategy for casual users of marijuana, we will continue to make the same mistakes that created this problem, while deepening the nation’s dependency on illicit and licit substances.

Sources:

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Video: The Flower

Thursday, August 26th, 2010

“The Flower contrasts a utopian society that freely farms and consumes a pleasure giving flower with a society where the same flower is illegal and its consumption is prohibited. The animation is a meditation on the social and economic costs of marijuana prohibition.”

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International Overdose Awareness Day

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010

Purple Ribbon for International Overdose Awareness DayOn August 31st, individuals and organizations all over the world will recognize International Overdose Awareness Day, meant to help promote knowledge of counterproductive drug laws and overdose solutions, and remember those who have been affected by a drug overdose.

Drug overdose is currently second only to motor vehicle crashes as a leading cause of death.  The number of deaths as a result of drug overdose have steadily increased over the last few decades, further evidence of a failed war on drugs.  Deaths from opioid overdose are among those which occur most frequently.

One piece of legislation meant to help address the drug overdose crisis in our country is the Drug Overdose Reduction Act (H.R. 2855).  H.R. 2855 would help provide training in overdose treatment to law enforcement officers and others, as well as grant resources towards overdose prevention research and methods (How is an overdose treated?).  In addition to these measures, we also need “Good Samaritan” laws which grants immunity to individuals witnessing an overdose so that they may report it without fear of arrest.

Please join us:

(more…)

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